slaughterhouse90210:

“But do you know this idea of the imaginary homeland? Once you set out from shore on your little boat, once you embark, you’ll never truly be at home again. What you’ve left behind exists only in your memory, and your ideal place becomes some strange imaginary concoction of all you’ve left behind at every stop.” ― Claire Messud, The Woman Upstairs

slaughterhouse90210:

“But do you know this idea of the imaginary homeland? Once you set out from shore on your little boat, once you embark, you’ll never truly be at home again. What you’ve left behind exists only in your memory, and your ideal place becomes some strange imaginary concoction of all you’ve left behind at every stop.”
― Claire Messud, The Woman Upstairs

wheresagnes:

aztec-princesss:

gohomeluhan:

As I’m walking through Target with my little sister, the kid somehow manages to convince me to take a trip down the doll aisle. I know the type - brands that preach diversity through displays of nine different variations of white and maybe a black girl if you’re lucky enough. What I instead found as soon as I turned into the aisle were these two boxes.

The girl on the left is Shola, an Afghani girl from Kabul with war-torn eyes. Her biography on the inside flap tells us that “her country has been at war since before she was born”, and all she has left of her family is her older sister. They’re part of a circus, the one source of light in their lives, and they read the Qur’an. She wears a hijab.

The girl on the right is Nahji, a ten-year-old Indian girl from Assam, where “young girls are forced to work and get married at a very early age”. Nahji is smart, admirable, extremely studious. She teaches her fellow girls to believe in themselves. In the left side of her nose, as tradition mandates, she has a piercing. On her right hand is a henna tattoo.

As a Pakistani girl growing up in post-9/11 America, this is so important to me. The closest thing we had to these back in my day were “customizable” American Girl dolls, who were very strictly white or black. My eyes are green, my hair was black, and my skin is brown, and I couldn’t find my reflection in any of those girls. Yet I settled, just like I settled for the terrorist jokes boys would throw at me, like I settled for the butchered pronunciations of names of mine and my friends’ countries. I settled for a white doll, who at least had my eyes if nothing else, and I named her Rabeea and loved her. But I still couldn’t completely connect to her.

My little sister, who had been the one to push me down the aisle in the first place, stopped to stare with me at the girls. And then the words, “Maybe they can be my American Girls,” slipped out of her mouth. This young girl, barely represented in today’s society, finally found a doll that looks like her, that wears the weird headscarf that her grandma does and still manages to look beautiful.

I turned the dolls’ boxes around and snapped a picture of the back of Nahji’s. There are more that I didn’t see in the store; a Belarusian, an Ethiopian, a Brazilian, a Laotian, a Native American, a Mexican. And more.

These are Hearts 4 Hearts dolls, and while they haven’t yet reached all parts of the world (I think they have yet to come out with an East Asian girl), they need all the support they can get so we can have a beautiful doll for every beautiful young girl, so we can give them what our generation never had.

Please don’t let this die. If you know a young girl, get her one. I know I’m buying Shola and Nahji for my little sister’s next birthday, because she needs a doll with beautiful brown skin like hers, a doll who wears a hijab like our older sister, a doll who wears real henna, not the blue shit white girls get at the beach.

The Hearts 4 Hearts girls are so important. Don’t overlook them. Don’t underestimate them. These can be the future if we let them.

You can read more about the dolls here: http://www.playmatestoys.com/brands/hearts-for-hearts-girls

*runs to target- i need to get my babydoll one for her 1st bday

ohmygosh and the one from Ethiopia has natural hair which you can’t get from the American Girl “just like you” dolls!

(via mydrunkkitchen)

Anonymous said: Thoughts on Malala winning?

thatsnotwatyourmomsaid:

image

image

image

image

image

image

conclusion: Malala is amazing and Western civilization has yet again proven to be hypercritical ignorant uncompromising and evil. how very fitting for columbus day.

"Be soft. Do not let the world make you hard. Do not let pain make you hate. Do not let the bitterness steal your sweetness. Take pride that even though the rest of the world may disagree, you still believe it to be a beautiful place."

— Kurt Vonnegut, via The Impossible Cool (via bookoisseur)

(Source: bijan, via bookoisseur)

"When a local government’s very existence depends on its citizens breaking the law — when fines from ordinance violations are written into city budgets for the upcoming year as a primary or even the main expected source of revenue — the relationship between the government and the governed is not one of public officials serving their constituents, but of preying off of them. When the primary mission of a police department isn’t to protect citizens but to extract money from them, and when the cops themselves don’t look like, live near or have much in common with the people from whom they’re extracting that money, you get cops who start to see the people they’re supposed to be serving not as citizens with rights, but as potential sources of revenue, as lawbreakers to be caught. The residents of these towns then see cops not as public servants drawn from their own community to enforce the laws and keep the peace, but as outsiders brought in to harass them, whose salaries are drawn from that harassment. The same goes for the judges and prosecutors, who also rarely live in the towns that employ them."

Why we need to fix St. Louis County (via wilwheaton)

(via bookoisseur)

"

It’s your flaws I want to taste.
Your brooked mouth.
The way you smell after being
out all day. Your knees, so eager
to bend
to whatever song is playing in
your head.
Your chest, as it rises and falls
and rises and falls
on the carpeted ground. Your
sometimes smooth chin.
Your pimpled politeness. Your
tangled hair.
Your good morning,
every morning.
I don’t want to be able to run
my fingers through you easily.
It is no fun writing about
perfections.

I want to talk about you.
Flawed. Crooked.
Endlessly
interesting.
You.

"

— Lora Mathis, Black Coffee (via larmoyante)

(via bookoisseur)

land-of-propaganda:

SHAUN KING’S SECOND BY SECOND ACCOUNT OF THE MURDER OF MIKE BROWN

— (Read his full article here) —

(10/15)

I hate this place sometimes.

(via bookoisseur)

lookdifferentmtv:

So in love with ALL of this from Girl Code’s race episode

Want to work on your own racial biases? Check out our racial bias cleanse.

(via bookoisseur)

thankyoufive:

disneyismyescape:

wiggins knows whats up

Happy Columbus Day. 

(Source: hartland)

humansofnewyork:

"I’ve spent my career in social work, finding jobs for people with disabilities. I love helping people, but I’m tired of being poor. So I’m looking for a job that’s a bit more commercial.""What was the most frustrating part of social work?""All the best people leave."

Same.

humansofnewyork:

"I’ve spent my career in social work, finding jobs for people with disabilities. I love helping people, but I’m tired of being poor. So I’m looking for a job that’s a bit more commercial."
"What was the most frustrating part of social work?"
"All the best people leave."

Same.

thankyoufive:

I’ve been seeing this making the rounds and I cannot “YAS” enough. The article expounds upon these points a little more, so read if you’re so inclined. 

 For those of you who don’t want to read the article, the 11 things are:

  1. Being helpful
  2. Being polite
  3. Being confident
  4. Being self-aware
  5. Being organized and on time
  6. Being tactful
  7. Being focused
  8. Being charming
  9. Being well connected
  10. Being prepared to work hard and make sacrifices
  11. Being modest