humansofnewyork:

"I’m studying music therapy. I just finished observing a music program for children with disabilities, and I’m taking notes.""So what’s something you observed?""Many of the children had some form of autism. And it seemed that playing music together gave them the satisfaction of contributing to a group and forming relationships, without the pressure of having to speak or maintain eye contact."

This is why arts are important. Among other reasons.

humansofnewyork:

"I’m studying music therapy. I just finished observing a music program for children with disabilities, and I’m taking notes."
"So what’s something you observed?"
"Many of the children had some form of autism. And it seemed that playing music together gave them the satisfaction of contributing to a group and forming relationships, without the pressure of having to speak or maintain eye contact."

This is why arts are important. Among other reasons.

Heh.

Heh.

(Source: wilwheaton)

"

Be patient with yourself. You grow at the rate you’re meant to grow, you heal at the rate you’re meant to heal. Have faith in yourself. Even when you’re lying on the floor of the shower sobbing. Even when you can’t get out of bed for weeks. Have faith in yourself. You are given what you can handle, you have the strength in your heart to go on. And you are here for a reason, I hope you know that. And I hope you hold on to the forever burning light ahead of you (I know it is so difficult to see sometimes but it is waiting for you). You were not made for the darkness.

Loss is inevitable. Cry when they go. Whisper to them through the stars. And instead of letting loss scar you and make you hide from the ones you love in fear of losing them too, love them even more. Appreciate the small moments shared. Let death be a reminder that this life is not long and that you must reach out and grab something if you truly want it. Be honest, be raw, be forgiving. Know that when your loved ones leave, they are not really gone. Death is nothing more than a transition. They will visit you in dreams, in feathers, in knocks on the window, in closing doors. You carry parts of their soul with you eternally.

When someone walks away from you, do not beg them to stay. Do not hold on to their ankles hoping it will stop them. Let them keep walking. Not everything is meant to last a lifetime. Sometimes people come into your life to show you a new light and a new dark. If your heart is full of them, let it remain that way. Love them through the leaves, through the people you interact with, through the moments alone, through unsent letters. Some people make homes in our hearts and it is difficult to tear them down. Let them leave anyways. If they are for you, only time can tell.

Do not look at another person with hatred in your eyes nor judgement in your heart. Let jealousy come and let it go. Love them because they are lucky enough to have the beautiful things that you desire. Bless them. Do not look down on someone for gossiping, for speaking harshly, for causing pain, for hating. The ones who are hurting and do not understand how to feel their own pain choose to inflict it on others. It is not a characteristic of an evil spirit, it is a struggling one. So when someone is mean, remember the pain you can’t see inside of them and love them. Forgive them for their actions. Forgive them for their words. Love them.

"

— Emery Allen (via emeryallen)

(Source: wethinkwedream, via bookoisseur)

"When you come into the theater, you have to be willing to say, “We’re all here to undergo a communion, to find out what the hell is going on in this world.” If you’re not willing to say that, what you get is entertainment instead of art, and poor entertainment at that."

— David Mamet (via conversationsfromthebooth)

Werd.

(Source: thespians-united, via didileavemycoffeeinthegreenroom)

catagator:

This teen girl’s response to the DFTBA sexual abuse scandal is out of this world and needs to be watched and thought about and discussed.

This is a 16-year-old girl. Her video gave me CHILLS. 

She is so important.

(via bookoisseur)

outside-center:

anchorsandmoons:

Dear god wait till she starts singing, seriously. 

Her voice.

Been listening to this band for a couple months now. Their popularity is skyrocketing, get on the wagon now!

Good stuff.

stand-up-comic-gifs:

Like fiery eyeball thing, no problem. But don’t even try to imagine a Samoan elf. (x)

Nuts to canon, I say.

(via bookoisseur)

astrodidact:


People need to know about Cayden. Really proud of these kids that do very grown up things. The level of humanity he displays at the age of 8 should be commended. 
8-Year-Old Raises Thousands of Dollars to Pay Off Past Due Lunch Accounts of Classmates
Let it never be said that even young children can’t see injustice in the world, nor are they powerless to do anything about it.
When 8-year-old Cayden Taipalus saw that some of this fellow classmates at school were forced to forgo hot meals because their lunch account balances had dipped into the negative, he came home upset. His school’s policy was to allow students to go $5 into the negative before replacing their regular hot meals with cheese sandwiches and milk, according to Tom Gould, director of public relations for the Howell Public School District where Cayden attends.

“Like a lot of districts, we use accounts where parents add money to their students’ accounts,” Gould said, explaining that parents are notified when their child has a negative balance. [source]

But it’s a problem that faces many students, with some children’s parents unable to afford to ever get them out of the negative. When he got home from school that day, he told his mother that he felt like it was unfair that some kids weren’t being served hot meals and instead had to eat cheese sandwiches because their lunch accounts had no money in them.

“I just want to make kids have a better lunch,” he told TODAY.com.

So he decided to do something about it. First, he and his mom began to collect empty bottles and cans and exchanging them as part of a recycling program. That got him about $64, and bought about 150 lunches. Pretty impressive for an 8-year-old, but Cayden was just warming up.
After he got a little local press for his act of kindness, people began contacting his family asking what they could do to help. Seeing an opportunity to make a bid difference, he started a campaign on an online fundraising site that got money to put towards his schools lunch program. The dollars began pouring in.
Hundreds of people from across the United States and abroad have donated, pitching in a staggering $10,800 to the cause so far. That’s enough money to pay for well over 4,000 school lunches. Cheese sandwiches will be a distant memory. Cayden probably just got a lot more friends around the school yard.
Clearly the project has outgrown it’s original purpose, so instead of calling it a day, Cayden and his mother have begun going to other schools to pay off their account balances too. Cayden says his goal is to raise enough money to help all students in his county.

Mother and son returned to two other schools last week to pay off lunch accounts, and will visit three more this week to spend the funds they’ve collected so far onFundRazr. They plan on adding extra funds to each overdue account, ensuring those students can get hot lunches for days to come. [source]

Cayden may be the youngest, but he makes up a growing trend of people who have tackled the problem of unpaid lunch accounts. After several stories recently revealed schools withholding food from kids who could not afford lunch and in one case even throwing out the food the children had already been served hundreds of individuals across the country have made contributions to their school districts in order to never allow a child to go hungry or be shamed because his or her parents didn’t pay their lunch bill.
http://iacknowledge.net/8-year-old-raises-thousands-of-dollars-to-pay-off-past-due-lunch-accounts-of-classmates/


Kids can be cool I guess.

astrodidact:

People need to know about Cayden. Really proud of these kids that do very grown up things. The level of humanity he displays at the age of 8 should be commended. 

8-Year-Old Raises Thousands of Dollars to Pay Off Past Due Lunch Accounts of Classmates

Let it never be said that even young children can’t see injustice in the world, nor are they powerless to do anything about it.

When 8-year-old Cayden Taipalus saw that some of this fellow classmates at school were forced to forgo hot meals because their lunch account balances had dipped into the negative, he came home upset. His school’s policy was to allow students to go $5 into the negative before replacing their regular hot meals with cheese sandwiches and milk, according to Tom Gould, director of public relations for the Howell Public School District where Cayden attends.

“Like a lot of districts, we use accounts where parents add money to their students’ accounts,” Gould said, explaining that parents are notified when their child has a negative balance. [source]

But it’s a problem that faces many students, with some children’s parents unable to afford to ever get them out of the negative. When he got home from school that day, he told his mother that he felt like it was unfair that some kids weren’t being served hot meals and instead had to eat cheese sandwiches because their lunch accounts had no money in them.

“I just want to make kids have a better lunch,” he told TODAY.com.

So he decided to do something about it. First, he and his mom began to collect empty bottles and cans and exchanging them as part of a recycling program. That got him about $64, and bought about 150 lunches. Pretty impressive for an 8-year-old, but Cayden was just warming up.

After he got a little local press for his act of kindness, people began contacting his family asking what they could do to help. Seeing an opportunity to make a bid difference, he started a campaign on an online fundraising site that got money to put towards his schools lunch program. The dollars began pouring in.

Hundreds of people from across the United States and abroad have donated, pitching in a staggering $10,800 to the cause so far. That’s enough money to pay for well over 4,000 school lunches. Cheese sandwiches will be a distant memory. Cayden probably just got a lot more friends around the school yard.

Clearly the project has outgrown it’s original purpose, so instead of calling it a day, Cayden and his mother have begun going to other schools to pay off their account balances too. Cayden says his goal is to raise enough money to help all students in his county.

Mother and son returned to two other schools last week to pay off lunch accounts, and will visit three more this week to spend the funds they’ve collected so far onFundRazr. They plan on adding extra funds to each overdue account, ensuring those students can get hot lunches for days to come. [source]

Cayden may be the youngest, but he makes up a growing trend of people who have tackled the problem of unpaid lunch accounts. After several stories recently revealed schools withholding food from kids who could not afford lunch and in one case even throwing out the food the children had already been served hundreds of individuals across the country have made contributions to their school districts in order to never allow a child to go hungry or be shamed because his or her parents didn’t pay their lunch bill.

http://iacknowledge.net/8-year-old-raises-thousands-of-dollars-to-pay-off-past-due-lunch-accounts-of-classmates/

Kids can be cool I guess.

(via the-pastoralist)

humansofnewyork:

"Adults always say ‘you’re too young to understand.’ Well, if they don’t tell us, how do they know we don’t understand?"

humansofnewyork:

"Adults always say ‘you’re too young to understand.’ Well, if they don’t tell us, how do they know we don’t understand?"

"

When things are nearby, they’re concrete and you can see the details of the things. On the other hand, when things are far away, they’re much more abstract. So thinking about things that are near and far puts us in different mental states. When you think about things nearby, you see the details, and so when a creative idea comes along, the first thing you ask is, can it work?

[But] most creative ideas are risky and the risks are obvious when you look at the details, so when you think about it with this detail-oriented mindset, you’re more likely to shoot the idea down. On the other hand, when you’re thinking about things that are far away, you’re in a more abstract frame of mind and so the first question you ask is not will this work; you’re more open to seeing the creative possibilities.

"

— NPR’s Shankar Vedantam highlights some curious research on why we miss creative ideas that are right under our noses, quite literally speaking. This is why the incubation stage of the creative process, where you step away from the problem at hand, is so important in producing the subsequent illumination stage. (via bookoisseur)

Sounds familiar.

(Source: explore-blog, via bookoisseur)

hijinksensue:

And you and all of your friends each want to get the top. From the base of the mountain, the top looks really small and it doesn’t seem like there’s going to be enough room for everyone. Even if it is big enough, you aren’t sure that all of your friends are going to make it all…

This is relevant to my life.