Why is John Oliver perfect?

(Source: sandandglass, via wilwheaton)

ilovecharts:

MASH for realists
startariott:

“just because drunk people drop shit” 


Also this needs to happen.

startariott:

“just because drunk people drop shit” 

Also this needs to happen.

(Source: pugsessed, via bookoisseur)

disneyprincessdefender:

I really love the story of Peter Pan in general. I like the novel, musical, various film adaptations and spin offs… I think that universe and those characters are really something special. I’m actually not a huge fan of the 1953 Disney version of Peter Pan. Shocking,…

New perspectives on a childhood favorite.

"

there’s a boy in my class that thinks that we live
in a post-racist, post-sexist society.
he thinks that discrimination doesn’t exist,
and i always want to ask him
when exactly he thinks it stopped.

i want to tell him about every single friend i’ve had who has been scared
when a man smiles at them on the bus, or tries to start a conversation
on the street, because yes, they might be harmless,
but they also might be the men we were warned about since we could remember.
i want to tell him about every friend who smiled back
because they were taught it’s impolite not to.

i want to tell him that i met my best friend when i was five years old
she has dark eyes and dark skin and dark hair
and is slogging through things a dozen times darker than she is
and she gets followed around stores by employees
who think she’s going to slip that lipstick into her pocket
because they’ve been trained to base what a shoplifter is around
what colour a person is.

i want to ask him what it’s like, being able to think things like that
without having to live through things that prove him wrong.
because god, i would love to believe him, but last week my friend told me
about a man who followed her most of the way home,
asking her about herself and matching her pace when she tried to get the hell away from him.

i want to have him sit down with everyone
who has personal experiences that debunk his blind theories.
i want him to try to tell them that we live in a post-racist,
post-sexist society and get uncomfortable
when they stare at him with an anger that can’t be expressed
by telling him to go fuck himself.

i want to ask him why he thinks it is that he feels an obligation to speak out with his opinion every time someone offers theirs.

i want to tell him to shut the fuck up and listen without laughing after the other person stops talking.

"

— 'Dear Generic White Boy Who Thinks Racism Died With Segregation,' by theappleppielifestyle. (via theappleppielifestyle)

(via bookoisseur)

ladiesagainsthumanity:

This article, “Everyone is totally just winging it, all the time,” has been making the rounds on the internet this week. The article argues that when public figures make unforced errors, it’s nice to remember that they, like us, are just making shit up as they go along and winging it all the time. 
While it is nice to remember that all of us feel like little kids faking it in a grown-up world sometimes (see: me losing my shit as my blender spews things over my entire kitchen), I actually think this kind of thinking is symptomatic of a crisis in American business structure: the valuing of intangible skills such as “leadership” or “vision” over hard skills and expertise. People who are seen as smart enough to talk about work for a living get to run the show, while people who *do* work for a living are seen as executors rather than innovators. 
There are obvious examples where experts need to be in charge, examples with life and death consequences: we wouldn’t want someone lacking expertise in how to make airplanes not crash in charge of making airplanes not crash, right? But at the companies where most of us work, it’s blurrier who the real experts are and therefore easier to confuse willingness to fake being an expert with actually being one. 
This is in no small part connected to systemic sexism and racism in the workplace — most women and people of color assume that the way to prove yourself is to work twice as hard and produce twice as much, when in reality doing that often gets you pegged as a worker rather than a leader. 
Long story short, I don’t think everyone’s winging it all the time. I think a lot of people who wing it get more power and higher salaries than people who don’t, and that’s a problem.
Is this something you see in your workplace? Tag your stories #NotWingingIt and I’ll reblog. In conclusion, here’s a gif of how Kelly Kapowski feels about workplace misogyny:
 

ladiesagainsthumanity:

This article, “Everyone is totally just winging it, all the time,” has been making the rounds on the internet this week. The article argues that when public figures make unforced errors, it’s nice to remember that they, like us, are just making shit up as they go along and winging it all the time. 

While it is nice to remember that all of us feel like little kids faking it in a grown-up world sometimes (see: me losing my shit as my blender spews things over my entire kitchen), I actually think this kind of thinking is symptomatic of a crisis in American business structure: the valuing of intangible skills such as “leadership” or “vision” over hard skills and expertise. People who are seen as smart enough to talk about work for a living get to run the show, while people who *do* work for a living are seen as executors rather than innovators. 

There are obvious examples where experts need to be in charge, examples with life and death consequences: we wouldn’t want someone lacking expertise in how to make airplanes not crash in charge of making airplanes not crash, right? But at the companies where most of us work, it’s blurrier who the real experts are and therefore easier to confuse willingness to fake being an expert with actually being one. 

This is in no small part connected to systemic sexism and racism in the workplace — most women and people of color assume that the way to prove yourself is to work twice as hard and produce twice as much, when in reality doing that often gets you pegged as a worker rather than a leader. 

Long story short, I don’t think everyone’s winging it all the time. I think a lot of people who wing it get more power and higher salaries than people who don’t, and that’s a problem.

Is this something you see in your workplace? Tag your stories #NotWingingIt and I’ll reblog. In conclusion, here’s a gif of how Kelly Kapowski feels about workplace misogyny:

 

theparisreview:

a man standson hishead oneminute—
then hesitdown alldifferent
—Aram Saroyan. Art: Hossein Zare.

Hm.

theparisreview:

a man stands
on his
head one
minute—

then he
sit
down all
different

Aram Saroyan. Art: Hossein Zare.

Hm.

(via bookoisseur)

My life.

My life.

(Source: ladiesagainsthumanity)

"I’ve learned that no matter what happens, or how bad it seems today, life does go on, and it will be better tomorrow. I’ve learned that you can tell a lot about a person by the way he/she handles these three things: a rainy day, lost luggage, and tangled Christmas tree lights. I’ve learned that regardless of your relationship with your parents, you’ll miss them when they’re gone from your life. I’ve learned that making a “living” is not the same thing as making a “life.” I’ve learned that life sometimes gives you a second chance. I’ve learned that you shouldn’t go through life with a catcher’s mitt on both hands; you need to be able to throw something back. I’ve learned that whenever I decide something with an open heart, I usually make the right decision. I’ve learned that even when I have pains, I don’t have to be one. I’ve learned that every day you should reach out and touch someone. People love a warm hug, or just a friendly pat on the back. I’ve learned that I still have a lot to learn. I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel."

— Maya Angelou (via wordsnquotes)

(via bookoisseur)

theanimationarchive:

I don’t even have to tell you why this is important or why you should support the Kickstarter to bring back Reading Rainbow; you know why. So go do it!

(via cultofkimber)